• Medical Mews 8, 75 Hopelands Road, Overport, 4091
  • Mon - Fri 8.00 - 16.00

Cornea Transplant

A cornea transplant, also called keratoplasty, is a surgical procedure to replace part of your cornea with corneal tissue from a donor. Your cornea is the transparent, dome-shaped surface of your eye that accounts for a large part of your eye’s focusing power.

A cornea transplant can restore vision, reduce pain and improve the appearance of a damaged or diseased cornea.
Most cornea transplant procedures are successful. But cornea transplant carries a small risk of complications, such as rejection of the donor cornea, which occurs in about 20 percent of transplants.

With some types of cornea problems, a full-thickness cornea transplant isn’t always the best treatment. Partial-thickness (lamellar) transplants may be used in certain situations. We are preforming both Deep Anterior Lamellar Keratoplasty (DALK) and Descemet’s Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty (DMEK).

Once your cornea transplant is completed, you can expect frequent follow-up exams for suture adjustment and treatment of inflammation. You will need to use eye drops for an extended period. Most people who receive a cornea transplant will have their vision at least partially restored. What you can expect after your cornea transplant depends on the reason for your surgery and your health.

Your risk of complications and cornea rejection continues for years after your cornea transplant. For this reason, expect to see your eye doctor annually. Cornea rejection can often be managed with medications. Your vision may initially be worse than before your surgery as your eye adjusts to the new cornea.

It may take several months for your vision to improve and you will require spectacles, contact lenses or laser surgery thereafter.